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Thread: Another Build Thread - My '32
          
   
   

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  1. #166
    firebird77clone's Avatar
    firebird77clone is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
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    Car Year, Make, Model: 69 nomad, 73 charger, 74 vega
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    The torsion bars sure do hide.

    I had to go to page six to get a look at them!
    .
    Education is expensive. Keep that in mind, and you'll never be terribly upset when a project goes awry.
    EG

  2. #167
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    stovens is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
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    Quote Originally Posted by rspears View Post
    Summit has a wide range of center caps, or if you google slot mag center caps there's several vintage ($$) sellers out there, many different varieties from the ones that slip in from the back to those that are held on with five screws from the front. https://www.summitracing.com/search/.../push-through/
    Roger the hardest thing is not knowing who made these mags originaly and the wierd variable sizes make it next to imposible to find replacement caps, I tried measuring the diameter of the one rusted cap but have had no success of finding a replacement. I think when the time comes I'll have to purchase a generic bolt on from back variety, but not happy at all with how they look from what I have been able to find!
    " "No matter where you go, there you are!" Steve.

  3. #168
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    Heck, when did you sneak your truck into my garage for a photo ? Wait, that is too tidy and I can't see cobwebs with man eating spiders in them so it isn't mine after all. Good to see the truck again though Steve and it is in dry storage and not deteriorating like my Roadster that the salt air is playing havoc with all the chrome.
    I maybe a little crazy but it stops me going insane.

    Isaiah 48: 17,18.

    Mark.

  4. #169
    J. Robinson's Avatar
    J. Robinson is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
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    Car Year, Make, Model: 31 Ford Coupe; 32 Ford 3-window
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    I've had several sets of aluminum slots (poor man's Halibrands?) over the years and I've never had any center caps! They've all been used and the caps were always missing when I got 'em. They have chrome lug nuts anyway and I just make sure the axle/ hubs are clean and painted... Works for me.

    firebird77clone - After the engine and grille are in place the torsion bars are virtually invisible unless you look for them. It's funny how many people don't understand how torsion bars work, too. I once listened to some "expert" explaining to his girlfriend how my C-Cab didn't have any front suspension and it was OK if it was rigid because the car was light weight and rear springs were enough. I edged past them, stepped up on the front crossmember, and bounced the front end about 3 inches a few times to show it wasn't rigid. I smiled at them and stepped off. I expected a barrage of questions, but instead he just turned and walked away. She shrugged, rolled her eyes and followed him. I don't know if he ever learned what he had just seen.
    Jim

    Racing! - Because football, basketball, baseball, and golf require only ONE BALL!

  5. #170
    J. Robinson's Avatar
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    I've been off track doing other things recently. Finally got back on the Deuce this week...

    Since Roger was able to supply me with the dimensions I needed, I set about the task of mounting my engine in the frame. I began by bolting the 454 big block engine and 700R4 trans together and then setting them on dollies between the frame rails. The dollies are the steel ones that normally are used under the car's wheels, but for this process I want the frame sitting on its wheels on the floor so I can confirm ground clearance, etc. I used wood blocks and shims to get the engine and trans at the correct height and leveled both directions. The dollies allowed me to shift the whole assembly fore and aft and side to side to get it aligned.

    In the picture below the 3 levels are visible (red arrows). There is one across the frame, one across the valve covers, and a small one on the carburetor boss to verify level long ways. To center the rear of the assembly I put a mark at the center of the X-member and aligned the center mold line on the trans. Up front I clamped a piece of flat stock across the frame and marked the center. Then I aligned the center bolt on the crankshaft with the mark. (Marks are indicated by green arrows) With the marks and levels all in place I could verify location and levelness with a quick glance at them. I had to cut a notch in the bottom flange of the X-member on the right side for trans clearance, but I failed to take a picture of it; I'll try to remember it later. With everything in position I was ready to install the front mounts.
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    Jim

    Racing! - Because football, basketball, baseball, and golf require only ONE BALL!

  6. #171
    J. Robinson's Avatar
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    I actually started fabricating the mounts before I positioned the engine and trans assembly as described above. I cut the main part of the brackets from 1/4 inch plate. They are 2 inches wide at the small end and 3 inches at the wide end. They are approximately 6 inches long (much longer than needed) at this point. At the small end I welded on a piece of 3/8 black iron pipe cut to 2 1/4 inches long.

    Next, these pieces are put in place (with a long bolt through each of them) and marked on the bottom for cutting. After cutting, grinding, and verifying the fitment I take measurements for the bottom gussets. These are made from 1/4 x 1 1/2 inch flat stock. I cut the gussets to length and weld them to the bottom of the brackets at about a 45 degree angle. A few more trial fitments and persuading the angle of the gussets with the vise, I finally get them where I want them (red arrow points to gusset). One last verification of level and location and I weld the brackets in place.

    At this point the tail shaft of the trans is supported by a piece of tubing and a short piece of chain, but the frame is supporting the engine and trans. Now I can raise the whole chassis up and get underneath to finalize the trans mount.
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    Jim

    Racing! - Because football, basketball, baseball, and golf require only ONE BALL!

  7. #172
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    Looking good, Jim. I especially like that level on the carb mount. Some say to pay no attention to the carb mount angle, but I say why would you not take advantage of the engineering that was done by the OEM designers instead of burying your head in the sand and starting over? The OEM engineers considered everything from driveline angles to oil levels relative to the crankshaft to pan to ground relationship, and to ignore all of that just isn't smart, in my book.

    Glad the measurements helped, too! Thanks for posting.
    Roger
    Enjoy the little things in life, and you may look back one day and realize that they were really the BIG things.

  8. #173
    J. Robinson's Avatar
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    Next logical step is, of course, the tailshaft mount. When I bought this frame it came with the bottom plate for the X-member. The plate has 8 holes for mounting to the X-member and two holes for the tailshaft mount. It was designed to accept a TH-350 trans. Since I'm using a TH-700R4 some modification is needed. The 700R4 is longer, the holes don't line up, and the pan interferes with the bottom plate. After lying on my back under the chassis and trial fitting the pieces I determined that by turning the plate backwards, moving it rearward, drilling new trans mount holes, and cutting off the front corners, it fits. So.., that's what I did. The pics are pretty self-explanatory.
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    NTFDAY, 34_40, rspears and 2 others like this.
    Jim

    Racing! - Because football, basketball, baseball, and golf require only ONE BALL!

  9. #174
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    And report on driveline angle? Carb still flat?????

  10. #175
    J. Robinson's Avatar
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    Very close. The u-joint angles are within 1 degree of same. When I put the correct tires on the front the carb plate should be near perfect; right now the front is high about 1/8 of the bubble in the level - close enough.
    NTFDAY, jerry clayton and rspears like this.
    Jim

    Racing! - Because football, basketball, baseball, and golf require only ONE BALL!

  11. #176
    J. Robinson's Avatar
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    The next step is to cut a drive shaft to fit this beast. I cut my first drive shaft back in 1975 and in the 42 years since I have probably done two dozen or so. I have cut drive shafts to fit everything from a long bed Chevy pickup to T-buckets. I have never paid to have one made; my method is completely self-taught and I only had one that shook a little. That was in my Sportsman stock car about 1992 or '93 and it was one I made in a hurry to get to a race. At 7200 RPM on the straightaways it rattled my teeth. After that race I re-cut, re-trued, and re-welded it and never had another problem. All the others were fine before and since because I was able to take my time. The moral of the story - take your time to make sure the shaft is straight and true.

    I started here with a drive shaft from a 1995 Camaro that I got from the local salvage yard for $20. The front yoke has the correct splines for the 700-R4 transmission and the rear U-joint fits the yoke on my 9-inch Ford rear. (I know Ford made a bunch of different yokes over the years, so it was pure luck that this joint and yoke matched. On my coupe and Track-T I had to get the special U-joints that adapt GM to Ford.)

    First step is to put the drive shaft yoke in the transmission. Shove it in as far as it will go and then pull it back about 3/4 inch. Let the other end rest on the floor. Now measure from the rear end yoke (where the U-joint seats) to the back edge of the front U-joint. (What we need here is a center-to-center distance, so back edge to back edge is the same thing.) I measured 29 7/8 inches. I need the finished shaft to be 29 7/8 inches, center-to-center, on the U-joints.

    Next, I remove the shaft and measure it from joint to joint - it is 41 1/2 inches long. I need to remove 11 5/8 inches.
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    Jim

    Racing! - Because football, basketball, baseball, and golf require only ONE BALL!

  12. #177
    J. Robinson's Avatar
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    Before we go cutting anything there are a couple of preliminary steps. First, mark the location of the yoke so we can get it phased the same when we reassemble the yoke to the shaft. Also, if there is a weight welded on somewhere for balancing, we'll need to put it back in the same "clock" location farther up the shaft. I mark these locations with a file. File a tiny notch on one of the yoke's "ears" and use the file to then scuff a line straight up the shaft beyond the distance where it will be cut off. Do the same with the weight - scuff a line up the shaft from the center of the weight. Finally, use a chisel and hammer to knock the weight off. Save the weight. Doesn't matter if it's bent a little; we'll fix it later. I may have the pictures out of order, but they're somewhat self-explanatory.
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    Jim

    Racing! - Because football, basketball, baseball, and golf require only ONE BALL!

  13. #178
    J. Robinson's Avatar
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    Now don't go lopping the rear yoke off with a chop saw or you'll ruin the whole thing. What we have to do here is grind the factory weld down so it's smooth and then cut through the outer tube only so we can knock the yoke out of the tube. After grinding the weld, I use a piece of thin aluminum wrapped around the shaft so I can mark a straight line around it. Poster board would also work just as well. After marking, the tube can be cut with a hacksaw, panel saw or whatever you have. I use a thin cut-off blade on my grinder to cut around the line about 3/32 inch deep. A firm rap with a hammer on one side of the yoke and it pops right off. Now you can see why I didn't want to just chop off the end.
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    Jim

    Racing! - Because football, basketball, baseball, and golf require only ONE BALL!

  14. #179
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    How do you keep the end caps on the u joint from falling off? Seems as though if I breathe on one it falls off.
    Ken Thomas
    NoT FaDe AwaY and the music didn't die
    The simplest road is usually the last one sought
    Wild Willie & AA/FA's The greatest show in drag racing

  15. #180
    J. Robinson's Avatar
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    Measure from the open end of the tube the amount to be cut off (in this case 11 5/8 inches). I used my chop saw now to cut the shaft, but it could be marked and cut with a hacksaw, panel saw, grinder, or whatever. I don't recommend using a tube cutter because it squeezes the tube and reverse-flares the cut end making re-installing the yoke a real challenge.

    If you are using one of the special adapter U-joints, now is the time to install it in the yoke. Regardless, if you haven't done so already, wrap the U-joint with a few rounds of masking tape or electrical tape to hold the bearing cups in place... because we're about to get violent! Seriously, on some drive shafts (this one included) the yoke is an extremely tight fit in the tubing. On these Camaro/Firebird shafts the yoke actually creates a slight flare in the end of the tubing, as we will see.

    The yoke will not go in the tube with a gentle tap; it will start enough to hold just a bit, but it will not go in far enough, so... after getting it started with the yoke aligned on the scuff mark I made earlier, I pick up the shaft and slam it vertically against the concrete floor to seat the yoke. This usually take 3 or 4 good hard slams, but it will go eventually. Once it's in there, put ONE tack weld on it someplace, preferably where it's not seated tightly against the shoulder. This will allow it to move a little for adjustment.
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    Last edited by J. Robinson; 08-24-2017 at 10:57 AM.
    NTFDAY and 53 Chevy5 like this.
    Jim

    Racing! - Because football, basketball, baseball, and golf require only ONE BALL!

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