Welcome to Club Hot Rod!  The premier site for everything to do with Hot Rod, Customs, Low Riders, Rat Rods, and more. 

  •  » Members from all over the US and the world!
  •  » Help from all over the world for your questions
  •  » Build logs for you and all members
  •  » Blogs
  •  » Image Gallery
  •  » Many thousands of members and hundreds of thousands of posts! 

YES! I want to register an account for free right now!  p.s.: For registered members this ad will NOT show

 
Like Tree3303Likes

Thread: 55 Wagon Progress
          
   
   

Reply To Thread
Page 122 of 122 FirstFirst ... 22 72 112 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122
Results 1,816 to 1,828 of 1828
  1. #1816
    Navy7797 is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Seguin
    Car Year, Make, Model: 1940 Ford p/u
    Posts
    750

    Beautiful work as always !
    MP&C likes this.

  2. #1817
    MP&C's Avatar
    MP&C is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Leonardtown
    Car Year, Make, Model: Walking
    Posts
    1,214

    Quote Originally Posted by rspears View Post
    You are a Wizard with the Lennox!! Amazing to stretch a 180 so accurately!!Thanks for sharing.
    There were a couple of learning curve scraps, but good ol' geometry came into play to get us close. The metal started as 16 gauge (.059) and after the linear stretching had thinned to .031 thickness on the ends.
    rspears likes this.
    Robert

  3. #1818
    hammer-time's Avatar
    hammer-time is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Rochester
    Posts
    27

    That's fantastic work...using what you have and no one will have anything like it.
    MP&C likes this.

  4. #1819
    rspears's Avatar
    rspears is offline CHR Member/Contributor Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Gardner, KS
    Car Year, Make, Model: '33 HiBoy Coupe, '32 HiBoy Roadster
    Posts
    11,044

    Quote Originally Posted by MP&C View Post
    There were a couple of learning curve scraps, but good ol' geometry came into play to get us close. The metal started as 16 gauge (.059) and after the linear stretching had thinned to .031 thickness on the ends.
    As I've gotten older the excitement is just figuring out how to "Gitter Done" is what counts. I thoroughly enjoy your posts with the details of how you figured out the steps to not just get it done, but get it done RIGHT!! I sincerely appreciate that you take time to document the steps you take, and then share them with us.
    Roger
    Enjoy the little things in life, and you may look back one day and realize that they were really the BIG things.

  5. #1820
    MP&C's Avatar
    MP&C is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Leonardtown
    Car Year, Make, Model: Walking
    Posts
    1,214

    We had ordered a 4 position switch for the power windows in the wagon, with plans to install in the console. Not knowing the origin of the part when it showed up, I thought some due diligence was in order and broke out the multimeter to test all the switch positions for connectivity. Wouldn't you know, one of the end switches had no contact in one position. Further investigation showed that the spring contact board was held in place with four tabs from the factory, except we only had three, which allowed the board/switch to lose contact. I sent the next picture of the damaged part (pointing to the damage with a white wire) in a message to the eBay seller who immediately questioned my abilities with a multimeter and assured me it functioned exactly as it should.



    So for a more direct approach, I assured them I knew how to operate a multimeter, and perhaps they should look at the attached picture this time. To help eliminate any interpretation errors, I had doctored the original rear view picture to make things more obvious since they missed the visual cues the first time....



    Oh, that. We'll send out a new switch. Thank you..

    So with the console on hold to make sure we didn't have to use a different style switch (in case their whole batch was bad) we turned our attention to the tailgate, and started the fit up of the Mad Mooks polished stainless border trim. https://madmooks.com/ To preface, I will say the Mad Mooks parts are some of the nicest fit and finish parts you'll find ANYWHERE to trim out your Tri-five Chevy, as well as parts for other GM vehicles. Only the corner pieces didn't fit our tailgate. It appears that when yours truly did the rust repairs of the tailgate (before repop's were available) the replacement patches weren't exactly spot on. So yes, this is my F-up..






    We had also ordered some stainless strips for the voids in the tailgate from McMillan Rod and Custom and wanted to retain the stainless border to use with these parts.





    We had some 19 gauge stainless in stock, so let's give this a go. First order is to make sure we can duplicate the dimpled hole for the countersunk screws...





    Next, the folded (side) flange on the trim piece is a consistent width and will need to be real accurate. So we opted for a hammer form to match the shape, used a tipping die to thin the bend location (to tell the metal where to bend) and a backstop on the Lennox to set the flange height. A paper pattern was used to capture the tailgate outline.









    After the flange had been folded, the top part of the hammer form is set aside and the bottom section used to hold the part for polishing. We'll get it polished, trim the width and punch dimple holes, and then do a final polish.








    Test fit looks much better to match our one-off tailgate.





    Robert

  6. #1821
    v8nutz's Avatar
    v8nutz is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    rocklin
    Posts
    601

    Wow, amazing work!
    MP&C likes this.

  7. #1822
    34_40's Avatar
    34_40 is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    New Bedford
    Car Year, Make, Model: 34 Ford 3W Coupe Replica
    Posts
    14,643

    I agree. Robert / MP&C , I think they are magicians!?!?!
    MP&C likes this.

  8. #1823
    MP&C's Avatar
    MP&C is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Leonardtown
    Car Year, Make, Model: Walking
    Posts
    1,214

    Thanks guys!

    Holes drilled, dimpled for countersink, and final polish. Like it was made to go there, one more to go....

    https://youtu.be/YLXN6m3qyi4?si=ZpVCVqhgkh92LRdG
    NTFDAY and v8nutz like this.
    Robert

  9. #1824
    MP&C's Avatar
    MP&C is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Leonardtown
    Car Year, Make, Model: Walking
    Posts
    1,214

    We got the other side trim done for the tailgate and I had been asked to show the hammer form in more detail, so here's another go.. We actually started by pulling a paper pattern of the profile, some autobody masking paper is taped to hang over the edge, and the tracing done to show where to trim. Although we didn't have the plastic in the way at the time, here the pattern is after trimming.



    This is the pattern we use for the overall of the stainless, so that once the flange has been folded we will have a border of paint surrounding the trim (set in somewhat). Once the 19 gauge stainless has been trimmed to match our pattern, we use the tipping die in the Lennox to thin the "bend line", this gives the metal a suggestion of where it needs to bend so we should have a somewhat sharper crease given how the MDF tends to compress under a hammer blow. Where I would normally use one of our round backstops on the lower die, this shows to leave us without contact with the backstop at the initial entry and final exit from the machine, as the backstop is centered on the die. To correct that, we opted for 3/4 flat stock that gives us contact the entire width of the die set.



    The backstop distance sets the height of the side flange of the trim, and here is the stainless after running through the tipping die for thinning the bend line.





    Then the stainless is clamped between our MDF hammer form, note the outer portion of the hammer form matches the thinned bend line exactly.







    The Sandwich is held together with screws and then clamped in the vise for the hammering operation...


    https://youtube.com/shorts/5WiGK0550...bhT7Mo5BjpPIHR


    Once complete the bottom half of the hammer form becomes a stable base for pre-polishing, and some shorter screws are used to keep thing in unison. We use our typical polishing sequence of 400, 800, 1500, and then polishing on the buffer using green compound for a darker hue.


    https://youtu.be/3OGAjPCnGwQ?si=cryFGWW1Q2eeEVfL


    After the initial polish, the outer flange is covered with masking tape (to protect from scratching at this next step) and calipers are used to set the width and mark the cut line, like shown here..



    The bulk is trimmed away using our Milwaukee M18 shears, and final done using Wurth snips. The edge is fine tuned with our Dynabrade belt file, and then the holes are located and dimple countersunk. Then another polish job, and all the parts are located in prep for drilling the screw holes into the tailgate. Really happy with the nice parallel setback from the edge with these new trim pieces to match my patch panels.







    Next we'll get all the holes drilled and our upholstery added in the center...
    Robert

  10. #1825
    Navy7797 is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Seguin
    Car Year, Make, Model: 1940 Ford p/u
    Posts
    750

    Very impressed with the trim especially because Stainless is a PITA. Thanks for your post.
    MP&C likes this.

  11. #1826
    MP&C's Avatar
    MP&C is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Leonardtown
    Car Year, Make, Model: Walking
    Posts
    1,214

    Got some pics from JB at the upholstery shop yesterday. The Radio Flyer wagon is now complete. He was initially going to do tan upholstery, but when he laid the red against the wagon he said the wild color won out. Better match to the build. So this little wagon was painted in Leonardtown MD, lettered and striped in Hummelstown PA, and now upholstered in Lexington SC. It really gets around..

















    NTFDAY, 34_40, rspears and 1 others like this.
    Robert

  12. #1827
    34_40's Avatar
    34_40 is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    New Bedford
    Car Year, Make, Model: 34 Ford 3W Coupe Replica
    Posts
    14,643

    What happens to it now?
    MP&C likes this.

  13. #1828
    MP&C's Avatar
    MP&C is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Leonardtown
    Car Year, Make, Model: Walking
    Posts
    1,214

    JB actually built it for his niece and nephew, who live in the midst of red clay South Carolina. So a bit of overkill for the intended purpose. But I can attest, itís not an off road vehicle, it doesnít pull well in the grass. Some ground clearance issues. So yes, we get a laugh out of the whole situation, and I donít know if it will ever be turned over to the kids. Their mom has agreed itís a bit over the top for the kids.
    Robert

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Links monetized by VigLink