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  • 2 Post By techinspector1
  • 2 Post By Dave Severson

Thread: Improved Geometry for GM Triangulated 4-bar susenpension
          
   
   

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  1. #1
    Mutt's37Buick's Avatar
    Mutt's37Buick is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
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    Car Year, Make, Model: 37 Buick Roadmaster
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    Improved Geometry for GM Triangulated 4-bar susenpension

     



    I have a GM triangulated 4-bar rear suspension from a 95 B-body that I plan to swap into my 1937 Buick (like the one in the picture).
    Still considering a torque arm set-up, but also looking at keeping with triangulated 4-bar for simplicity and lower cost.
    I already bought UMR Performance adjustable lower control arms with Roto-joints on the axle end.
    I have read that it is best to have all arms the same length.
    The standard upper control arms are much shorter, so I'm wondering if I should try to fit something longer for better ride, or performance.
    Suggestions and guidance would be welcome.
    Thanks
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  2. #2
    techinspector1's Avatar
    techinspector1 is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
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    Same answer I gave you on the other forum.....
    I don't think I would try to second-guess the professional engineers who designed this arrangement in the first place.....not unless I was also a mechanical engineer.

    I will include a link to the two best suspension books I ever read though.....I buy used to save some sheckels…..

    buy the first offering here, from mdsvtr….
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-list...condition=used

    buy the first offering here, from oncereadbooks….
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-list...+carroll+smith

    Also, probably one of the best chassis and suspension engineers that I ever read was a fellow named Billy Shope, who called himself the Philippine Cowboy. He was one of the original Ramchargers, a team of Chrysler engineers who fielded a 1949 Plymouth coupe in C/Gas back in the late 50's, a car called The High and Mighty.
    https://www.allpar.com/racing/high-mighty.html

    I had links to Billy's writings and formulas at one time, but have lost track of them. He hung around on Hotrodders for many years, but I have not seen anything of him in the past few years. I think maybe he moved on to that drag strip in the sky.

    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...-Shope-page-18
    BINGO-BINGO-BINGO, read this......
    http://www.shopeshop.org/contentsDrag.htm
    .
    Last edited by techinspector1; 09-21-2018 at 12:28 PM.
    PLANET EARTH, INSANE ASYLUM FOR THE UNIVERSE.

  3. #3
    Mutt's37Buick's Avatar
    Mutt's37Buick is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
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    Thanks for the info.

  4. #4
    firebird77clone's Avatar
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    I love the High and Mighty, it inspired fear, awe, and astonishment at its stance, splayed pipes and elevated carbs. Also it was the loudest car at the track.
    .
    Education is expensive. Keep that in mind, and you'll never be terribly upset when a project goes awry.
    EG

  5. #5
    Dave Severson is offline CHR Member/Contributor Visit my Photo Gallery
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    Quote Originally Posted by techinspector1 View Post
    Same answer I gave you on the other forum.....
    I don't think I would try to second-guess the professional engineers who designed this arrangement in the first place.....not unless I was also a mechanical engineer.

    I will include a link to the two best suspension books I ever read though.....I buy used to save some sheckels…..

    buy the first offering here, from mdsvtr….
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-list...condition=used

    buy the first offering here, from oncereadbooks….
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-list...+carroll+smith

    Also, probably one of the best chassis and suspension engineers that I ever read was a fellow named Billy Shope, who called himself the Philippine Cowboy. He was one of the original Ramchargers, a team of Chrysler engineers who fielded a 1949 Plymouth coupe in C/Gas back in the late 50's, a car called The High and Mighty.
    https://www.allpar.com/racing/high-mighty.html

    I had links to Billy's writings and formulas at one time, but have lost track of them. He hung around on Hotrodders for many years, but I have not seen anything of him in the past few years. I think maybe he moved on to that drag strip in the sky.

    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...-Shope-page-18
    BINGO-BINGO-BINGO, read this......
    http://www.shopeshop.org/contentsDrag.htm
    .
    Hats off to you for the links to Billy Shope's writings, thought I was the only one still alive that used his teaching as a reference! After taking just enough engineering courses to be dangerous I do like to play with suspension ideas. As you and others have said, too many overlook things like Ackerman angle, bump steer, etc. My justification for tweaking the factory designs is that they had to build a car that Grandma was comfortable driving, I still attempt to "tune" them to my liking, sometimes successfully, sometimes not!
    jerry clayton and Hotrod46 like this.
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