Welcome to Club Hot Rod!  The premier site for everything to do with Hot Rod, Customs, Low Riders, Rat Rods, and more. 

  •  » Members from all over the US and the world!
  •  » Help from all over the world for your questions
  •  » Build logs for you and all members
  •  » Blogs
  •  » Image Gallery
  •  » Many thousands of members and hundreds of thousands of posts! 

YES! I want to register an account for free right now!  p.s.: For registered members this ad will NOT show

 

Thread: flat black with ghost flames
          
   
   

Reply To Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 40
  1. #16
    FMXhellraiser's Avatar
    FMXhellraiser is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Car Year, Make, Model: 46 Chrysler,49 Ford,66 F100,68 Lincoln
    Posts
    2,835

    I do not think a flat color will work with a pearl that will shine so it won't come out with a ghost look. The John Deere paint works very well and will hold up to any weather. They use it on tractors so of course it will hold real good, it doesn't chaulk white either.
    www.streamlineautocare.com

    If you wan't something done right, then you have to do it yourself!

  2. #17
    dangeroustoy's Avatar
    dangeroustoy is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    NW Arkansas
    Car Year, Make, Model: 32 Ford Hi Boy Roadster
    Posts
    677

    CAJUN1...

    I may not have explained myself very well... I believe that you will be able to see the pearl paint underneath the dulled clear, but I don't believe it will look like a pearl... While I have never exactly tried this, I have wet sanded clear coats with pearl under them and when the finish is dull the pearl is not nearly as noticable and looks more like tinted paint... It just does not gleam like a pearl should...

    I agree that you will be able to see it and if you lay down a couple of nice coats it should be able to have enough contrast to be seen...

    Sorry, I did not explain it "clear" enough...

    Dave Brisco

  3. #18
    brianrupnow's Avatar
    brianrupnow is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Barrie-Ontario-Canada
    Car Year, Make, Model: 1931 Roadster Pickup
    Posts
    2,018

    If you want this neat effect, lay down your flames and clear them with gloss clear, then back mask the flames, spray the rest of the car with flat Blitz black, then clear the black with a flattened clear. If you get a bad tapeline at the junction between the clears, water sand it out and buff.
    Old guy hot rodder

  4. #19
    SprayTech's Avatar
    SprayTech is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Wichita
    Car Year, Make, Model: 37 Ford tudor humpback
    Posts
    695

    Am I reading this correct?
    You want pearl flames flattened ?
    I hate to say it but why waste money using pearl in a flattened clear? Like dangerous mentioned , you most likely will have just a flat looking mud flames , the shine of clear is what makes pearl POP in the sunlight !
    I dont think I would waste money on something that cant be seen .
    Why not go with a traditional type flame job , like go from white, fadded into yellow , fadded into orange , fadded into red at the tips, and use flattener in each color to have the flat look through out the whole flat black paint skeem ?
    Just my 2 pennies worth
    SprayTech

  5. #20
    FMXhellraiser's Avatar
    FMXhellraiser is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Car Year, Make, Model: 46 Chrysler,49 Ford,66 F100,68 Lincoln
    Posts
    2,835

    Gloss flames on flat black WON'T make ghost flames man. It's like having a male side of a cord going into the male side of a extension cord, just won't work. Sorry to tell you that, I know you wanted positive answers but... that's how it goes I guess.
    www.streamlineautocare.com

    If you wan't something done right, then you have to do it yourself!

  6. #21
    mike schramm is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    hattiesburg
    Car Year, Make, Model: 71 chevy pickup, 56 chevy bel air
    Posts
    11

    I have a flat black truck with clear flames. I sprayed the truck with a single stage Dupont gloss black and befor it cured well I rubbed it down with a scotch brite pad. then I taped off the flames and sprayed it with clear.

    mike
    Attached Images

  7. #22
    mike schramm is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    hattiesburg
    Car Year, Make, Model: 71 chevy pickup, 56 chevy bel air
    Posts
    11

    another one from the front.
    Attached Images

  8. #23
    FMXhellraiser's Avatar
    FMXhellraiser is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Car Year, Make, Model: 46 Chrysler,49 Ford,66 F100,68 Lincoln
    Posts
    2,835

    See, now that was what I was talking about. You don't see that a lot, well at least I haven't seen that before. That is what I would like to do to a truck, flat black and gloss flames.
    www.streamlineautocare.com

    If you wan't something done right, then you have to do it yourself!

  9. #24
    dangeroustoy's Avatar
    dangeroustoy is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    NW Arkansas
    Car Year, Make, Model: 32 Ford Hi Boy Roadster
    Posts
    677

    Nice...

     



    Mike that is a very nice technique on your truck...

    Great job...

    Dave Brisco

  10. #25
    brianrupnow's Avatar
    brianrupnow is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Barrie-Ontario-Canada
    Car Year, Make, Model: 1931 Roadster Pickup
    Posts
    2,018

    Could you not achieve exactly the same effect by painting the entire thing Blitz (tractor) black, let it dry for a week, then mask off your flames same as you would do for a conventional flame job, then spray the area where you want the flames to be with clear???
    Old guy hot rodder

  11. #26
    FMXhellraiser's Avatar
    FMXhellraiser is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Car Year, Make, Model: 46 Chrysler,49 Ford,66 F100,68 Lincoln
    Posts
    2,835

    I think it all depends Brian. I think you are supposed to throw the clear on at a certain time. Like you are supposed to wait I think 3 or 5 hours and put a second coat on if you wan't with the Blitz balck and if you wait any longer then it will start to screw up. Here is some things to look at with that John Deere BB paint. I know this isn't specifically answering your question Brian but it should help man.

    From: Valspar Paint General Manager. (They make Blitz Black for John Deere.)

    #1. If the existing paint is relatively good condition (ie. no peeling paint, no large amount of rust, etc) no primer is needed. Scuff sand the existing paint with extra fine grit sandpaper, wipe surface with a clean cloth and then apply John Deere Blitz Black.

    #2. If primer is used due to bare metal or minor surface defects, we suggest the John Deere Buff Primer (available in aerosols, quarts and gallons). This is a very "user friendly" formulation that provides good sandability, excellent filling/sealing properties and enhanced corrosion resistance.

    #3. A reducer is needed for optimum sprayability and appearance. We suggest the use of the John Deere thinner/reducer (available in quarts gallon and fives). It is formulated specifically for John Deere paints. The mix ratio is 8 parts John Deere paint : 1 part John Deere thinner.

    #4. John Deere Blitz Black is an "air dry" formulation...but if a you want the paint to dry faster and harder, John Deere has a hardener in their product line. It is available in pints, part number REN3001. The mix ratio is 8 parts John Deere paint : 1 part REN3001 hardener : 1 part John Deere thinner.

    And the curing window, etc is:
    Shooting to a good surface IE: Bare metal, John Deere Primer, or to a good base of existing paint scuffed up.
    1 light tack coat and wait no longer than 15 minutes to shoot the full wet coat.
    For a second coat which is NOT needed but why the hell not.
    Wait up to but NO longer than 3 hours to apply second coat.
    But if you go past 3 hours DO NOT shoot another coat because the paint will react and go to $#!T. Wait 36 hours until you shoot the next coat. For each coat the same times apply. But one good coat with the 8 to 1 to 1 (8-1-1 paint-thinner-hardener) will be more than enough.

    If I can get ahold of this 53 chevy truck then I am going to be doing the flat black and I was thinking of either metallic blue flames over it but not solid, only an outline that kind of fades in the center and there will be the black in the center of them, or the gloss black flames. I can't decide which to do yet. Either way I think is different.
    www.streamlineautocare.com

    If you wan't something done right, then you have to do it yourself!

  12. #27
    brianrupnow's Avatar
    brianrupnow is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Barrie-Ontario-Canada
    Car Year, Make, Model: 1931 Roadster Pickup
    Posts
    2,018

    FMX--during the 70's I flamed many cars and vans, with great success. I found that for painting flames it went like this----if you painted your car in acrylic enamel with the proper hardners, you could mask it off in 24 hours, scuff it litely with a scotchbrite pad, spray your flames, unmask in about 6 to 10 hours and never have a problem. Cars that were painted in a "standard enamel" were more of a pain----you had to use a hardner in the paint and wait at least a week, mask it off, then spray the flames---the really trick part was in pulling the tape after the flames had dried. Standard enamel does not adhere to the car as well as acrylic enamel, so when you were pulling the tape from your flame job, it was a real bitch to keep from pulling peices of the paint job off the car, stuck to the masking tape. I think what I would do is instead of using Blitz black, I would use black acrilic enamel with a flattening agent in it for the first coat., then mask off the flames and spray the clear or colour and clear, if only to prevent lifting the black when I pulled the tape.
    Old guy hot rodder

  13. #28
    Jerilynne1965's Avatar
    Jerilynne1965 is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    :)
    Car Year, Make, Model: 3 Pontiac T/A's, 1965 Ford F-100
    Posts
    447

    Thumbs up WOW!

     



    Originally posted by mike schramm
    I have a flat black truck with clear flames. I sprayed the truck with a single stage Dupont gloss black and befor it cured well I rubbed it down with a scotch brite pad. then I taped off the flames and sprayed it with clear.

    mike
    Mike ~ VERY NICE!!!!! I haven't ever seen that effect...It looks AMAZING!!!!! I LOVE IT!!!
    You miss 100% of the shots you never take

  14. #29
    brianrupnow's Avatar
    brianrupnow is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Barrie-Ontario-Canada
    Car Year, Make, Model: 1931 Roadster Pickup
    Posts
    2,018

    Here is a picture of me and a flame job that I done on a friends car about 15 years ago.
    Attached Images
    Old guy hot rodder

  15. #30
    Jerilynne1965's Avatar
    Jerilynne1965 is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    :)
    Car Year, Make, Model: 3 Pontiac T/A's, 1965 Ford F-100
    Posts
    447

    Thumbs up Sharp

     



    Brian, that's a gorgeous flame job...good grief, I can't even draw a round smiley face right...
    You miss 100% of the shots you never take

Reply To Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Links monetized by VigLink