Welcome to Club Hot Rod!  The premier site for everything to do with Hot Rod, Customs, Low Riders, Rat Rods, and more. 

  •  » Members from all over the US and the world!
  •  » Help from all over the world for your questions
  •  » Build logs for you and all members
  •  » Blogs
  •  » Image Gallery
  •  » Many thousands of members and hundreds of thousands of posts! 

YES! I want to register an account for free right now!  p.s.: For registered members this ad will NOT show

 

Thread: New to Motors and site Need Help
          
   
   

Reply To Thread
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    mustangkid's Avatar
    mustangkid is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Kenai
    Car Year, Make, Model: 98 Ford Mustang V6
    Posts
    15

    New to Motors and site Need Help

     



    Hi guys,

    I just started my first hot-rod project and it seems I am in a little over my head. I thought this would be easy but it is a lot more complex than I thought.

    Here is what I am starting with, the motor is a Ford 302 Marine Motor. It was rebuilt last year for a boat and the owner left it sitting outside so it got somewhat rusted. I managed to save the block, i got all of the Pistons, lifters, bearings, camshaft, and Crankshaft out without too much difficulty. I have a pretty good idea of what I want to do but not sure how to go about doing it, or if maybe I should take a different kind of approach.

    What I Have:
    Block and Heads are both Cast Iron.
    Block: 302 Bored .030 over Casting Number D2OE-6015-AB 3A4
    Heads: I believe to be 351 Heads Numbers on Heads 000E, 10A, 351 WF, 2H4 or 2M4
    High Torque Camshaft (From a Friend)

    Looking to make a 347 Stroker out of this 302.
    Keeping the 302 at .030 over
    using the 351 Heads if that is what the truly are
    Go with a 3.400 stroke Crankshaft
    5.4" Connecting Rods (Not sure if I or H Beam would be better)
    .030 Pistons (Looking for 9.6-10.2 Comp Ratio, not sure what style pistons would be best, Flat, Dish, dome, or any variation of those with valve reliefs, Forged or Hypereutectic pistons)
    High torque Camshaft,
    Hydraulic Lifters,
    Carb: Not sure Looking at a 4BBL Double Pump Double Feed, preferabbly Edelbrock,
    and Intake Manifold is another thing I am not sure of.
    Going with just regular Exhaust manifolds for now.

    These are just a start to the questions that I will be having.
    The motor is going into a 1996 Ford Mustang.
    I want to be able to take this car out onto the street, but also take it to the dragstrip for some weekend fun.

    Thank You for any and all suggestions.

  2. #2
    mustangkid's Avatar
    mustangkid is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Kenai
    Car Year, Make, Model: 98 Ford Mustang V6
    Posts
    15

    and what would the best RPM range be? As another side thought I think I am going to use a C-6 Transmission geared down for more torque less high end, and not sure about rear gears yet

  3. #3
    Itoldyouso's Avatar
    Itoldyouso is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    fort myers
    Car Year, Make, Model: '27 ford/'39 dodge/ '23 t
    Posts
    11,036

    I'm kinda building a new motor for my 27 Ford along the same lines as you are, except I decided to go with a 331 stroker kit instead of a 347. If you were simply wanting to do a mild build at the 306 CI size I would say you are going to be ok with the engine you are starting with. But I wouldn't spend the kind of money you are going to have to put into this engine starting with a 1972 Ford marine engine.

    You say you are new to this...........we all were at one time, so let me give you some advice if I can. Marine engines always scare me for a buildup. The reason is salt water. Unless the engine was fresh water cooled or run in only fresh water it has seen a whole bunch of corrosion inside the block in the past 37 years. A friend of mine rebuilt a 350 Chevy boat engine and when he was all done one on the cylinder sleeves rusted right through, he had to scrap it and start over.

    Secondly, there are so many good late model 302 blocks around that they make so much more sense to build. From 86 up they are already roller cam engines so you can slide in a Motorsport or other cam and be way ahead of what that 1972 engine would give you. You say you cleaned up the rust but that is no basis to build a 347 stroker on. The block should be tested, and then line bored, decked, overbored or honed again, hot tanked, new cam bearings and freeze plugs. The work I outlined will cost somewhere in the neighborhood of $ 700 to $ 800 generally. Then the stroker kit will cost you $ 1000.00 minimum, and you haven't even started to buy the cam kit, do a valve job, or add all the other parts like intake, carb, timing set, etc.

    Please understand I am not trying to discourage you, but I think it would be a real mistake to start dumping serious money into a 37 year old boat motor when there are so many better engines to start with. Maybe what you should do is clean up the internals of the engine you have, do a ring and bearing overhaul, and get it running. Use it until you can build the stroker you want. To do what you outlined is going to cost you $ 4000.00 minimum, probably more.

    Good luck with whatever you decide.

    Don

  4. #4
    mustangkid's Avatar
    mustangkid is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Kenai
    Car Year, Make, Model: 98 Ford Mustang V6
    Posts
    15

    Thanks for the advice Don, The reason I am doing this is because my mustang i drive now only has a 3.8L V6 and it is currently running. But my 1997 Dodge Ram Sport is my main mode of transportation henceforth why I am doing this to my mustang.

  5. #5
    NTFDAY's Avatar
    NTFDAY is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Springfield
    Car Year, Make, Model: '66 Mustang, 76 Corvette
    Posts
    4,815

    I agree with Don, start with a 502 roller and be prepared to do a lot of electrical work if you change to a carbureted engine. BTW< Edelbrock doesn't make double pumper carbs and dp's and automatics don't work well together on the street.
    Ken Thomas
    NoT FaDe AwaY and the music didn't die
    The simplest road is usually the last one sought
    Wild Willie & AA/FA's The greatest show in drag racing

  6. #6
    Fheckro's Avatar
    Fheckro is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Reidville
    Car Year, Make, Model: 69 Mach I
    Posts
    14

    what Don said...and always use forged pistons.

  7. #7
    Dave Severson is offline CHR Member/Contributor Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Madison
    Car Year, Make, Model: '67 Ranchero, '57 Chevy, '82 Camaro,
    Posts
    20,876

    Before you spend a bunch of money building an engine and hopefully hitting the right pieces to make it work, maybe check with a company like CNC Motorsports (I'll use them cuz they're 50 miles from where I live and have good products and service) and compare costs of building the engine to buying one already balanced, clearanced, assembled, and ready to go!!!!! With the price of machine work and parts, if you don't have your mind made up on exactly what is going to work best you might actually save money!!!!!

    The shop that does the machine work is probably the most important part of any engine build!!!! If the clearances, balance, cleaning, and hardware isn't right it just doesn't really matter how good the pieces are you put in it!!!!!!
    Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, Live for Today!
    Carroll Shelby

    Learning must be difficult for those who already know it all!!!!

  8. #8
    Rrumbler is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Las Vegas
    Car Year, Make, Model: Sans hot rod, sold the truck.
    Posts
    1,207

    I, too, agree with Don. I think you are tossing your bucks away on that 302 you have. I understand the need for saving a nickel wherever you can, but ----. For what it will cost you to get the parts and get that engine you have running, you can buy a fully assembled, test run remanufactured crate engine, and will have a few less headaches to mess with in your swap. Same expenditure, better outcome. Also, personally, I wouldn't touch a used marine engine, especially an older one, with a twenty foot pole; and in Alaska, it is sure to have been run in salt water, and most likely seriously corroded inside.
    Rrumbler, Aka: Hey you, "Old School", Hairy, and other unsavory monickers.

    Twistin' and bangin' on stuff for about sixty or so years; beat up and busted, but not entirely dead - yet.

  9. #9
    mustangkid's Avatar
    mustangkid is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Kenai
    Car Year, Make, Model: 98 Ford Mustang V6
    Posts
    15

    The motor was just rebuilt the summer of 2008, never hit the salt water, I have the motor currently down to the bare block there is no rust on the cylinder walls, and the little rust that there is will be easily cleaned up by a shop. and I also have a 302 out of a wagon that was running in a friend of mines stock car that he gave to me, so I have another block as an option. I am choosing to go with the 302 because it fits into my car much nicer than anything else will. The other block has a casting code of D8VE-6015-A3A would this be a better one to start with it? It came out of a Ford Wagon of some sort, don't remember the name right off the top of my head. Also the cam my buddy has for me he says is not a roller cam, but still to use hydraulic lifters would this be correct?
    Last edited by mustangkid; 09-14-2009 at 10:09 PM. Reason: had more information

Reply To Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Links monetized by VigLink