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  • 1 Post By techinspector1
  • 1 Post By rspears
  • 2 Post By glennsexton

Thread: More power
          
   
   

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  1. #1
    Moschenrose is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
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    Question More power

     



    Just got a C2500 with the 350. I'm pretty sure its all stock. I want more than the stock 230 hp, or whatever it gets now. I'm just looking for a cheap way to get closer to 300 hp, but be simple enough for me to do. I am not a mechanic, just would like to have a powerful truck and maybe learn something from all of you motorheads. The truck is a 1989

  2. #2
    34_40's Avatar
    34_40 is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
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    Car Year, Make, Model: 34 Ford 3W Coupe Replica
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    First let me say Welcome to the club! Nice to see you here.

    Next, I don't really want to sound negative but horsepower costs money, what kind of budget are you willing to spend? ANd what's the goal for the truck?

  3. #3
    rspears's Avatar
    rspears is offline CHR Member/Contributor Visit my Photo Gallery
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    Car Year, Make, Model: '33 HiBoy Coupe, '32 HiBoy Roadster
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    Welcome to CHR. Adding 70 plus HP to your bone stock 350 is a pretty big step to do on the cheap. As a "C" it's 2WD, so like Mike says, give some ideas as to how you plan to use the truck, what tranny you're running, the rear gears & tire size now and most important your budget for upgrades and guys will start throwing ideas at you. Also, what's the mileage on the truck, and do you know the history of the engine relative to rework (wondering if you have a good base for a 40% power increase).
    Roger
    Enjoy the little things in life, and you may look back one day and realize that they were really the BIG things.

  4. #4
    techinspector1's Avatar
    techinspector1 is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
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    First thing I would do is to identify what you have. A Gen I '89 truck motor would have been a flat tappet cam most likely, but who knows, it could be a roller cam from the factory. Some disassembly of the motor may be necessary to determine the lifter type. Let's begin by getting the numbers off the block and try to identify what you have there.

    The block casting number will be at the left side rear of the block (driver's side if you drive on the right side of the road) just before where the bell housing bolts to the block. Identifying it may require using a toothbrush with some Dawn dishwash detergent on it and a little water to wash off the crud so you can read it. Sometimes it requires a telescoping mechanic's mirror and definitely requires a strong light to read the number correctly. Sometimes the casting was not finished properly and an 8 will look like a 3 and vice versa.
    http://www.speednik.com/files/2013/0...asylum-com.jpg

    The suffix code will be stamped into the engine block on the right side of the block (passenger side if you drive on the right side of the road) at the very front, just ahead of the cylinder head and adjacent to the top water pump bolt head. Depending on the equipment on the motor from the factory, this number may be hidden behind an alternator, power steering pump or air conditioning compressor. It will appear like the "V" numbers/letters shown here....
    http://jmacperformance.com/wp-conten...D-numbers2.jpg
    http://www.chevyasylum.com/tech/V8Stamp2r4t.jpg

    I have not worked on EFI motors too much, so don't know much about the fuel delivery system, but I might be thinkin' blower or turbo with a chip upgrade. Puffing about 5 to 6 psi into the motor should net you a 30-40% increase in power and put a grin on your face without changing the cam and opening up a can of worms, but it won't be cheap. For a lighter hit on your wallet, you might also consider boltin' on some "spray", an N2O system that can be easily removed when you're tired of playin' and want to sell the truck. A 100 hp or 150 hp system could be bolted on for less than 1,000 bucks and not require teardown beyond removal and re-install of the throttle body. The really neat way to install these is with a 1 gallon fuel cell (holding race gas or methanol to prevent detonation) mounted in the engine compartment....although turning your dry intake manifold into a wet system may not be the hot tip....keep reading....

    NOS kit....
    http://www.andysautosport.com/produc..._05153NOS.html

    fuel cells....
    http://my.starstream.net/beccruice/'...se%20Small.JPG
    http://s553.photobucket.com/user/yob..._0117.jpg.html
    http://s601.photobucket.com/user/nos...yron2.jpg.html
    http://s70.photobucket.com/user/GFor...lhoun.jpg.html
    You should consider that the blower or turbo installation costs stop with the install, whereas the nitrous oxide systems require continual re-filling of the nitrous bottle and the 1 gallon fuel tank.

    Order this used book by David Vizard to learn how to install and use N2O....
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listi...condition=used
    Order this used book by Pat Ganahl to learn how to install and use a blower....
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listi...condition=used
    Order this used book by Jeff Hartman to learn how to install and use a turbocharger....
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listi...1242551&sr=1-3

    Lots of good information plus details about wet, dry or direct systems here....
    http://www.andysautosport.com/additi...noscatalog.pdf

    .
    Last edited by techinspector1; 12-27-2015 at 02:48 PM.
    Matthyj likes this.
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  5. #5
    Moschenrose is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
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    I know my truck has 160k miles with 9-1/2in rear diff. I'm not sure about transmition. Its automatic and I know that the pan is square pan with 16 bolts which means its one of three: (4L60/TH700/or 4L60E). I would like to know how to identify which one I have. I have about a 500 budget. I was going to use the money to buy exhaust that is pretty bad now. Overall the truck is solid, engine doesn't knock or leak fluid. I use this truck as a daily driver but I can afford to be out of a vehicle for a few days to work on it.

  6. #6
    rspears's Avatar
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    With the truck at 160K miles, a $500 budget and no mention of the engine being rebuilt I'd probably fix the exhaust and drive it. As you do, start planning what you'd like to do to the truck, make a plan on parts you'll need, and save money for a staged upgrade. Like Tech says, the first step is to know what you've got, so get the block numbers and suffix like he suggested, and come back with that.

    Given that you've said you're not a mechanic, the 160K miles, and your need for a reliable daily driver you might consider that the biggest value might be to save for a would be to shop for an engine, tranny and harness takeout package from a later model truck or car. You can find low mileage packages from salvage yards and end up with a sweet package, parts available at any Chevy dealer, on-board diagnostics, etc, etc.

    Another option is to save for a crate engine from Chevrolet Performance - https://chevroletperformanceparts.co...75-base-engine Just be sure to check the specs and select a hydraulic roller cam for long term reliability with today's oils.

    While you can get some quick additional power with NOX or a blower, I would not think that either would be a good value for you considering the high miles and need for the truck as reliable daily transportation. Pushing a 150 shot into your old engine might just be the last hurrah - an exciting last ride before a forced rebuild. Just my $0.02, and good luck with the old truck.
    glennsexton likes this.
    Roger
    Enjoy the little things in life, and you may look back one day and realize that they were really the BIG things.

  7. #7
    jerry clayton's Avatar
    jerry clayton is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
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    Illinois rust bucket???????????

    For a daily driver and a $500 budget, I would suggest fixing the exhaust and going thru the brakes and driving it.

    If you can work up a $5000 budjet----you can look into possibly big block install or better yet a fuel injected take out of a late model salvage


    And since its that old, already has a Dana rear-------you could even consider a Ford or Mopar big block or a diesel?????????

    I had a 1984 crew cab that I put 100,000 miles towing race car from 84-95 with 454 , auto, 4.11 single axle rear --got about 9 mpg and down to 6 on the road making it to a race-didn't much matter if was toeing or not-6 - 9 is what it got---------

  8. #8
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    firebird77clone is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
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    $500 budget won't get you power, but it can make it a dependable daily driver.

    With that budget, think salvage yards.
    .
    Education is expensive. Keep that in mind, and you'll never be terribly upset when a project goes awry.
    EG

  9. #9
    Moschenrose is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
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    Okay. thank you all. I just want to know what to start saving for maybe in the next year or so.

  10. #10
    glennsexton's Avatar
    glennsexton is offline CHR Member/Contributor CHR Contributor Visit my Photo Gallery
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    Welcome to CHR!

    As mentioned in the posts above, $500 will not go real far. The exhaust and brakes are a priority from a safety standpoint. You should be able to get decent dual exhaust and brake tune up for that sum and as Jerry mentioned, save a chunk and start planning what you'd like to build. A takeout - as Roger suggests - might be a good point of departure to build from. My guess is that you’ve got the most common combination for a 1989 C2500 - a stock 210 horsepower 350 with a 700R4 transmission. Nothing wrong with that and 160,000 miles is not atypical of these rigs. If it’s not leaking or blowing big clouds of blue smoke it may run for a good long time as a daily driver allowing you to plan and save. In the event you decide to do a wrecking yard engine/transmission you could haul it home, build the engine exactly as you want it and then take the truck out of commission only for the swap.

    We not trying to tell you what you "can't do" but most here have a lot of real world experience in building vehicles and engines. It would appear that this is your first project and we’ve all been there and remember how we wanted to build one to the max first thing without considering the cost in time and money.

    Go to your local book store (or amazon.com) and buy a couple books on SBC builds. Read them and then read them again. Start to gather tools that are called out in the books and remember that if you’re going to use them for a lifetime, buy quality tools (some of my hand tools are 65+ years old); however, if you’re only going to use them once you don’t have to buy the best and most expensive – e.g. Harbor Freight engine stands are just fine for all but hardcore engine builders.

    Keep us in the loop!
    Glenn
    34_40 and rspears like this.
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