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Thread: 350 build questions
          
   
   

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  1. #1
    Fortune18 is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
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    350 build questions

     



    Know nothing about cars. What do i need to get this thing running?
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  2. #2
    DennyW's Avatar
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    Car Year, Make, Model: 34 Chevy Truck
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    How old are you, and what do you know at this point in time about mechanics ?



  3. #3
    Fortune18 is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
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    Young. From what i can tell it needs a intake malifold, carb, and push rod?

  4. #4
    DennyW's Avatar
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    Quick list right off... Just looking at the picture...
    Hydraulic Lifters
    Pushrods
    Rocker arms
    Rocker ball pivots, and nuts
    Intake gasket set
    Intake manifold
    Carburetor
    Throttle linkage
    Thermostat housing
    Thermostat
    Temp sender (intake manifold)
    Looks like oil sending unit is not there
    Intake manifold bolts and washers
    Valve covers
    Valve cover gaskets
    Valve cover nuts
    Distributor assembly
    Spark Plug wires
    PCV Valve
    Last edited by DennyW; 04-16-2017 at 04:19 PM.
    Rrumbler and glennsexton like this.



  5. #5
    Fortune18 is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
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    Wouldnt believe it but its a 79 malibu and the truck keyhole had been drilled. Still wouldnt open. Popped out a speaker to take a look in the trunk where i saw some what looked to be stock paneling, black trim etc. Jiggled a screwdriver in the key hole for a bit and and the trunk clicked. Along with all the excess panels and trim were valve covers. Brand new b&m floor shifter. A distributor. Push rods lifters and rocker arms!

  6. #6
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    my question would be why is it all apart. Did you buy it that way? How do you know the bottom end is good or even the valves. You should get answers to these questions before spending $$$$$$ on a busted engine.
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    Charlie
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  7. #7
    techinspector1's Avatar
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    This should be your first purchase. New from Swati21, $13.78 plus 3.99 shipping....... $17.77 delivered to your front door.
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-list...2389189&sr=1-1

    Read through this book several times, then disassemble the motor down to the bare block and begin the rebuild. Assume nothing, take everything you find at face value. If it's good for part of the rebuild, put it in one pile. If it's junk, put it in another pile. The very first thing I would buy after the book is a 12" dial caliper.

    Here's an affordable unit that is obviously an offshore unit (China) judging by the price, but it's just fine as a starter tool for a young fellow to get used to measuring things in and on a motor. You can even measure block deck height with this 12" unit. My best advice is not to buy an electronic caliper. I have owned them and every time I would reach for them to use them, the batteries were dead. These DIAL calipers are bulletproof, they work every time you need them.
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/12-Precision...EAAOSwDmBY3Lzm
    .
    Last edited by techinspector1; 04-16-2017 at 06:58 PM.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by techinspector1 View Post
    This should be your first purchase. New from Swati21, $13.78 plus 3.99 shipping....... $17.77 delivered to your front door.
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-list...2389189&sr=1-1

    Read through this book several times, then disassemble the motor down to the bare block and begin the rebuild. Assume nothing, take everything you find at face value. If it's good for part of the rebuild, put it in one pile. If it's junk, put it in another pile. The very first thing I would buy after the book is a 12" dial caliper.

    Here's an affordable unit that is obviously an offshore unit (China) judging by the price, but it's just fine as a starter tool for a young fellow to get used to measuring things in and on a motor. You can even measure block deck height with this 12" unit. My best advice is not to buy an electronic caliper. I have owned them and every time I would reach for them to use them, the batteries were dead. These DIAL calipers are bulletproof, they work every time you need them.
    12" Precision Stainless Steel Dial Caliper Shockproof Mechanical 4 Way Caliper | eBay
    .
    Excellent advice for a rebuild, but if I'm not mistaken that's a flat tappet engine and I wouldn't spend a nickel on it when the cost of a replacement roller cam engine is so reasonable. With the rust on the intake surfaces I'd say the cam is likely toast, and like Charlie says maybe the bottom end too. Buy the book, read it twice, take apart the engine to learn something then buy a nice base line 350 roller to drop into the Malibu.
    Roger
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  9. #9
    Fortune18 is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
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    Just ordered the book! Its dark now. I did want to replace the cam anyway and im gonna take a look at it tomorrow. What should i look for to make sure the cam is still worth leaving in there?

  10. #10
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    You would have to mike the lobes. I don't know the wear tolerance specs, but I'd suspect that if it is more than a couple thou, it's due for replacement.
    .
    Education is expensive. Keep that in mind, and you'll never be terribly upset when a project goes awry.
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  11. #11
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    Double entry. Please delete. Thank you.
    Last edited by techinspector1; 04-17-2017 at 05:43 AM.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by firebird77clone View Post
    You would have to mike the lobes.
    And there is the reason for the dial caliper.

    .
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  13. #13
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    If you simply look at a new camshaft, at the parts store, and compare it to how yours looks, you will see right away if you need a cam. The older cams had a hardness about 32 thou in hardness deep, before it actually ate into the softer metal of the camshaft. Trust me, if it's past the hardness stage, you will see it right off. I've changed cams in Chevy's back then, as soon as 30,000 miles. Plus, look at all the bottoms of the lifters. Compare them... Other that that, right off, I would say, get yourself someone who is close by where you live, and see if they will help you learn some things. Just starting out, a book will help teach you what to do, but, hands on, really teaches you how to do it right. You have to practice anything to be good at it.

    Plus:
    350 build questions
    Know nothing about cars. What do i need to get this thing running?

    With the replies of buy this, and buy that, I think maybe a little misleading... Here's why, you know nothing about cars, as you say... That means, you have zero actual experience. That is the number one thing needed to accomplish this goal your after.

    Sorry tech, but I'm quoting you on what you just told another guy. It about somes it up... Just this once...

    ((First, how much money do you have to put toward such a project?
    Would you do the work yourself or shop it out to professionals?
    If you have the money and expertise to do it yourself, do you have the space and tools to accomplish it?))

    At this point, you have no ideal what all it takes to get the job done. To do it right, you need to learn, and save to buy what you need. but, before you do so, think about if this is going to be something you will do over and over, OR, just this one time deal...Because all the tools you will need to do the job right, is going to cost you...
    Last edited by DennyW; 04-17-2017 at 07:12 AM.



  14. #14
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    Looks like it has fairly new front schock absorbers
    Exhaust valve rotaters

    No sludge buildup in the nooks and crannies , fairly clean in the valley, probably had pretty decent maintenance done to whole car------if you can find the lifters , look at bottoms of all of them for obvious wear patterns--------they have a slightly crowned base so that they will rotate as the cam turns-if they don't turn they will kill the cam-------------

    looks like a little oil residue by the exhaust crossover port on the left head-------

    Pull the plugs and see what they look like-don't mix them up

    How many miles are on vehicle?????

    From looks of what I see I'd probably put the intake and carb on with some fresh gas, oil and filter and fire it up to check it out-----just cost of intake gasket and some oil-----
    DennyW likes this.

  15. #15
    techinspector1's Avatar
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    Flat tappet hydraulic lifters have the foot of the lifter ground on about a 50 inch radius, so they are slightly rounded on the foot. This, together with the uphill grind on the cam's lobes, causes lifter rotation which keeps the lifter/lobe working with each other. Problems arise when the lifter fails to rotate and the cam begins to eat the foot of the lifter. The lifter goes first, then takes out the cam lobe. You can hold two new lifters together end to end and you will be able to see the radius. If there is no radius, the lifter(s) are toast and the cam is not far behind. The problems with flat tappet cams began when the oil companies stopped adding extreme pressure lubricants to the off-the-shelf motor oils. They did this because the auto manufacturers were having an excess of warranty claims due to clogged catalytic converters. Apparently the extreme pressure cam lube in the motor oil was doing the damage. Well, as you can imagine, as soon as extreme pressure lubes disappeared from off-the-shelf motor oils, we began to experience lifter/camshaft failures. This tutorial that I wrote several years ago will explain it better than my long-winded explanation here......
    http://www.crankshaftcoalition.com/w...ips_and_tricks

    Most of us have changed our way of doing things, opting for hydraulic roller cams in our motor builds. Roller cams require only off-the-shelf motor oils and require no break-in.

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