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Thread: laquer vs urethane
          
   
   

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  1. #16
    HOTRODPAINT's Avatar
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    As far as I know, it is illegal to sell lacquer in California, so you won't be able to buy it there. Try Hemmings Motor News, but make sure any supplier is able to ship it to you.

    Don't be suprised if you find the color selection very small. Buy extra for future repairs, because in 10-20 years, it will not be available in most cities. I live in a town of almost a million, and I can only get black, white and clear......and it's not against the law here, it's just not popular any more.

    You might ask yourself: "If painters are abandoning it by the thousands, what is the reason?" I can tell you that urethanes are superior in many ways. After using lacquer for 40 years, the only advantage, that I can see, is that it is a little better for doing artwork. The urethanes are very tough...lacquer is very fragile. Urethanes have great adhesion....lacquer is problematic for adhesion. You can get any color or product for urethane....lacquer is vanishing fast. None of the new car color formulas are being created for lacquer.

    ....and the final proof that it is finally on it's way out....

    I was a dedicated lacquer fan, but I just gave away about $7500 worth of lacquer, just to get it out of the shop.....and I would NEVER do that! :-) After 40 years of devotion, I finally saw the writing on the wall.

  2. #17
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    ditto

  3. #18
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    1 thing that is good with laquer is if you get a run, you can play with the run until it comes out, which you cannot do with today's enamels, that's what I'v been told anyway.
    You don't know what you've got til it's gone

    Matt's 1951 Chevy Fleetline- Driver

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  4. #19
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    Actually, the runs sand out of base coat as easy as lacquer, and usually the top coat is catalyzed, and you can sand and buff them out.

  5. #20
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    Ither way, I'm not using laquer on my car, just a single stage enamel.
    You don't know what you've got til it's gone

    Matt's 1951 Chevy Fleetline- Driver

    1967 Ford Falcon- Sold

    1930's styled hand built ratrod project

    1974 Volkswagen Super Beetle Wolfsburg Edition- sold

  6. #21
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    Sounds like a good solid plan....durable....and you can sand and buff if you want a better finish. I've used it many times.

    Just be sure to cover your hair!!! I have a lot of gray hair, and I hate it when I shoot red enamel, and it turns my hair pink! I get unwanted attention from some people. :-)~

  7. #22
    hochus pocus is offline CHR Member Visit my Photo Gallery
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    Re: laquer vs urethane

     



    dave i know what you are looking for you can use bc/cc but in your clear coat use flop agent mixed in with your clear it will give the finish a shiny but hazy looka little cloudy it looks sweet

  8. #23
    TatraMan is offline Registered User Visit my Photo Gallery
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    Lacquer V. Erethane

     



    I also understand what the original submitter was asking about. I too love the look of lacquer. Modern paints looks extremely wet all the time, which in my eyes looks cheap. Lacquer does not look wet and deep like the new paints. The real question for me is, how do you simulate the look of lacquer paints using modern paints? Hochus Pocus was saying something about a "flop agent". I'm not a painter, so could you explain? Is there a company out there that sells paints designed to simulate lacquer for people restoring vintage automobiles? What is the best type of paint to use for simulating lacquer? Thanks.

  9. #24
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    I think the reason lacquer tended to look different was that was usually sanded and buffed to a very flat surface, which most guys don't achieve with urethane, but it also tended to have less gloss, as it would need constant attention and waxing to keep it fresh looking.

    Also, the way paint pigments are made today, colors are richer and more vibrant.

    Block out your primer before painting, use very basic color formulas from the 60s-70s, use a single stage catalyzed urethane with no clearcoat, block the paint flat when you finish spraying, and don't stay on the buffer long enough to achieve full gloss.

  10. #25
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    lacquer v urethane

     



    Hello, Thanks for the reply. When you mention single stage paints, does this include metallic paints? Or do you have to use a clearcoat on metallics?
    Thanks.

  11. #26
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    Yes. It includes metallics, but you have to use a clearcoat with a herdener, IF you want to sand and buff. Otherwise you will be sanding the color pigment or the little metallic flakes.

    Single stage means one type of color. What they do is to add clear to the mix so it will dry with a gloss finish.

    Two part, or two stage, means that you shoot a color first, and then a clearcoat. On this type, they only use enough paint resin to stick pigment to the surface, and it dries without a gloss.

  12. #27
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    And then you have the wounderful world of Tri-Stage

    2 Types :
    1: A metallic/pearl coat 9 and can be any color choice ), with a translucent color ( any color choice too ) over the top , with each coat ( called a mid coat ) getting deeper/darker . Then finish it off with clear .
    Mixing bases and mid coats can achieve some crazy colors , especially House fo Kolor Kandies !!
    But for an easier application , you can use , Say for instance , You want a Kandy Blue , you can use a metallic blue base , then the Kandy blue over it .
    A person doesnt have to use the standard Gold , Silver , Pearl White , Pearl Black . And for a real crazy kandy job , use several base colors fadded/blended into each other , then a Kandy Kolor of your choice over it for an Extreame effect
    Makes for a different look with flames or scallops !

    2: A Solid base color , with a pearl mid coat over that , usually 2-4 , any more then that it will usually go muddy looking . Then finish it with clear.

    Painting and spotting can be tough !!!!

    Spray

  13. #28
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    Ahh yes. Tri coats, such as Chrysler's Inferno Red, and others.

    I recently attempted to color match the hood on a Dodge Magnum. I made two attempts at it, then for the first time in over 30 years, I returned the customer's money, and sent him to the dealership.

    It was a good reminder why I tell customers not to choose a candy paint job for the street.

  14. #29
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    They are animals arent they ..........

    I spot them Tri suckers all day long , I think every Cad, new bonne , and now the friggin Envoys are Tri-Stage , matter of fact I have a bumper , right 1/4 and doors to spot on an Envoy tomarrow, I have been spotting these bastages since the friggin cad allanti , what a pisser that was !

    The trick is not keeping the spot tight HRP , and knowing how many mid coats to apply, most fords, chryslers, and GMs require 3-4 blend out mid coats. I think once you got the hang of them ( factory tris ) , you would do alright .
    For a door ding in say a rear door I will take the 1/4 and the front door for blending out , as the pearl coat needs to be sprayed super thin , and several stair stepped layers , then the mid coat mixed accordingly , then stairstepped out , They arent ment to keep tight , een though I have succeded in doing it , after doing them for 20 years , at one time I was the only guy in town that did them , and insurance companies told the customers to bring them to the shop I worked at , now with all the Paint company schools teaching painters how to do them , I just get the return GM cars , but every once in awhile i run into a chrysler or ford .

    Spray

  15. #30
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    Spray Tech, I was repairing the hood as a favor, since I got the job doing some 60's inspired stripes, on a red Magnum, but from the start the color was too blueish, so I don't know if the paint code wasn't the same color for the new year-models or what! Color matching candy production cars is NOT my forte'! I'll find a picture.

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